ImageOut 2019

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ImageOut 2019

Special Screening
Special One-Time Screening

Duration: 

Varies

Rating: 

Not Rated

About the Film:

Starts 6:30 p.m. Friday, Oct. 11: Vita & Virginia (110m)

“Madness. What a convenient way to explain away her genius.”

Those of us who took any type of literature course in college or who saw/read The Hours think we know pretty much all there is to know about literary icon Virginia Woolf: her creative genius, her bouts with mental illness, her long-suffering husband, Leonard. Did you know of her struggles with her sexuality? That her gender-bending novel Orlando was actually based on a real woman? Of her affair and love letters to fellow writer and socialite Vita Sackville-West? Vita & Virginia, based on the play by Emmy award-winner Eileen Atkins, allows us to be flies on the wall during this time in her life, and it is so worth it.

It’s 1920s London, and Vita Sackville-West (Gemma Arterton, Quantum of Solace) is a popular, best-selling writer. She’s also married to a diplomat, has two children, is a wealthy socialite, and a feminist before her time with a reputation for eschewing societal rules, announcing what she wants, and getting it. And what she wants is to meet and befriend fellow author and mysterious recluse Virginia Woolf (Elizabeth Debicki, The Great Gatsby, Widows).

9:30 p.m. Friday, Oct. 11: An Almost Ordinary Summer (Croce e delizia) (100m)

In Italian and French with English subtitles.

It’s looking like a perfectly ordinary summer vacation when Carlo brings his family to stay at a beach house he “rented” on the property of Tony’s seaside estate. Meanwhile, Tony has gathered his family for what appears to be an ordinary family dinner. But what their families don’t know is that not only are these two seemingly straight grandfathers in love with one another, they’re planning to get married in just three weeks! Despite their families’ expectations, this is not going to be an ordinary summer.

1:45 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 12: Queering the Script (85m)

If you have ever “shipped” a couple on a TV show, wished a couple was gay that actually wasn’t, decided a couple was even if the showrunners disagreed, or have simply watched carefully the number of queer characters on television in general, this fascinating and super timely documentary is for you.

Director Gabrielle Zilkha talks to industry experts, website mistresses, showrunners, writers, actresses, and fans about the state of female queer representation on TV as Queering the Script takes us back to the beginning. From Ellen’s historical coming out episode to the tandem births of the Internet and Xena, Warrior Princess, we see how the word “fandom” became the norm and how the collective love/heartbreak/rage of that fandom can affect the direction of a show, and how #BuryYourGays spawned an outrage of fans so enormous, it created Clexacon, the world’s largest multi-fandom event for LGBTQ women and allies.

4 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 12: Quick Licks (Shorts) (96m)

ImageOut's 2019 Shorts Programs are made possible through the generosity of longtime ImageOut supporters David D. Emert and Jon P. Templin.

Whether you’re young or young at heart, this inspiring, and sometimes funny, collection of stories of queer women will make you believe in life and love.

7 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 12: The Garden Left Behind (88m)

For his feature film directorial debut, Flavio Alves (short film Tom in America, ImageOut 2014) teams up veteran actors Ed Asner and Michael Madsen with relative newcomer Carlie Guevara in an intimate, poignant, and powerful film portraying the marginalization, struggles, and transphobia experienced by an undocumented trans woman of color in New York City.

9:30 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 12: Good Kisser (75m)

In Good Kisser, writer/director Wendy Jo Carlton (Hannah Free, Jamie & Jessie Are Not Together) takes us on an exploration of the hazy lines of modern dating in a refreshing way we haven’t really seen before.

Jenna (Kari Alison Hodge – Crazy Bitches, the Web Series) and Kate (Rachel Paulson, East Siders — and Sarah Paulson’s little sister!) have been together for almost two years when they decide that maybe spicing up their relationship is in order. At Kate’s urging, they decide to try out having a date with a third woman. Jenna is shy and nervous going in, not at all sure of herself, but the second she lays eyes on Mia (Julie Eringer,  Fox Trap), she starts to think maybe this isn’t such a bad idea after all.

As the evening progresses, alcohol is consumed, music is danced to, stories are shared, and though something seems slightly off, Jenna can’t put her finger on it. Until she stumbles across a secret that changes everything.

Take a little comedy and a little drama, add it to some romance, toss in a nice helping of sexy. Mix it all together and you’ve got Good Kisser—not your average lesbian romance that will change the way you look at popsicles forever.

12:15 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 13: Unsettled: Seeking Refuge in America (82m)

This eye-opening film powerfully captures the struggles faced by these LGBT youths. Finding housing and employment were daunting enough tasks prior to 2016, but now they find themselves in an America where the Statue of Liberty may as well be holding a “No Vacancy” sign. Hopefully, this film can illuminate the importance of understanding, compassion, and activism needed to make America a safe haven for those seeking refuge from persecution based on their sexual orientation or gender identity.

12:30 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 13: My Baby's Got A Secret (Shorts) (107m)

ImageOut's 2019 Shorts Programs are made possible through the generosity of longtime ImageOut supporters David D. Emert and Jon P. Templin.

Secrets and lies have become essential to our gay lives, partly to protect ourselves and partly to protect the people we love. These are just some of our stories.

WARNING: Strong sexual content.

2:30 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 13: Zen in the Ice Rift (Zen sul ghiaccio sottile) (87m)

In Italian with English subtitles.

Margherita Ferri directs this visually enticing film and thankfully doesn’t fill it with transgender tropes and the all-too-often sensationalized focus on transitions. That fact, combined with Conti’s powerful performance as Zen, makes the film an uplifting and spirited “must see.”